Lokuron Lohyia

Matthew Sawatzky photo

Matthew Sawatzky photo

Lokuron Lohyia doesn’t know how old she is. Her husband, Lonyia, is in the cattle camp and they were married when she was young. Their daughter, Longor, is two months old and their son, Lowi, is three. Of their 20 cattle, only one remains after a raid. Before the drought, Lokuron and her family ate in the morning and evening, sorghum, milk and wild vegetables. Now they live on wild food and the food from the aid distribution. Two nights a week they go to sleep without eating. She will share the rations with her relatives and it will last two to three days. However, she doesn’t have enough breast milk for Longor so is buying milk in the market. Lowi is malnourished and too weak to walk the three hours to the market with her. His diet is getting supplemented with Plumpy Nut (a high-protein bar). It is another three-hour walk to the borehole to fill a 5L jerry can with water that will last the day. Lokuron says food distribution programs like this must continue, and that more people need to be registered.